Lynchburg Living Top Teacher Award Winners 2016-2017

0

Being a teacher is more than just a job; it’s more than just a career. It’s a calling. It takes a truly special (and very, very patient) individual to educate, nurture and inspire our young people.

In our 3rd annual Top Teacher awards, Lynchburg Living is recognizing a few of the area’s most deserving educators. After reviewing nomination forms submitted by members of the community, a panel of judges selected our 2016-2017 winners.

From their favorite memories to their biggest challenges, learn more about the Top 10 on the following pages. They represent multiple school systems and grade levels. But they all had so much in common—including how they love it when a student finally understands something for the first time or how they wish they had more time in the day.

To all Central Virginia educators, not just those on this list, we thank you for your perseverance and dedication. You are pillars of our community.


Lynchburg’s Top Teachers

Crystal DeLong
School: Liberty High School
Years as an Educator: 19
Currently Teaches: 9th grade World History II, Practical Law, 12th grade AP Government

Special Recognition:
• 2017 Region 5 Teacher of the Year
• 2017 Bedford County Teacher of the Year
• 2017 Liberty High School Teacher of the Year
• 2002 Staunton River Middle School Teacher of the Year

Educational Background:
• University of Bath-United Kingdom, Master of Arts in Education-International Education
• Roanoke College, Bachelor of Arts-History
• Virginia Tech, Master of Arts-Political Science (present)

Why did you become a teacher?
For as long as I can remember, I always wanted to be a teacher; I believe that everyone has a calling and I know without a doubt that I have been called to teach. Nothing feels more natural than stepping into a classroom and interacting with students. My passion for history runs
deep, and I am privileged to be able to share that every day with my students.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
As a teacher, the greatest thing I can do is to inspire my students to become life-long learners. The “Aha!” moments when a student finally grasps a concept are the moments and accomplishments that make teaching fulfilling. That is why I continue to come back every day and year after year. Even when challenges seem insurmountable, nothing is more rewarding than making a difference in a student’s life.

What are your biggest challenges?
Some days the biggest challenges I face in the classroom are helping a student to grasp a concept or to take ownership of their learning. Through differentiation and personalized learning I hope to be victorious in those situations. Paperwork and grading can feel overwhelming at times, but overall, the rewards of teaching greatly outweigh the challenges we face as teachers.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
One of the most rewarding things I have been a part of in the past 10 years is Model United Nations (MUN). It was incredible to watch students’ worldviews expand as they became more exposed to other cultures and countries. Several of my MUNers have shared how MUN gave them confidence in speaking and debate, as well as expanding their worldview.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
A good teacher invests in her students and school both inside and outside the classroom. The service aspect of National Honor Society was one of the main reasons I agreed to be the advisor. Serving alongside my students at the Big Island Fall Festival, Roanoke Rescue Mission or with Habitat for Humanity has provided lots of great memories.

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
I am grateful to have the opportunity to teach your children. Thank you to all those who support public education. We need your support as parents and stakeholders to be successful in the classroom. Thank you for entrusting your children to us.

From Her Nomination:
“[Crystal Delong] is a selfless individual that comes to work every day to make a difference in every student’s life. She has natural leadership ability and articulates the needs of the school to ensure that Liberty High School is the best that [it]can be. As the leader of Liberty High School, it is a pleasure to work with such a dedicated teacher and she deserves to be recognized for her outstanding commitment to Liberty High School, Bedford County Public Schools, and the field of Education!”
—Kathy Dills, Principal of Liberty High School


Justin Neal
School: Yellow Branch Elementary
Years as an Educator: 5
Currently Teaches: 2nd grade

Special Recognition:
Received two grants from DonorsChoose.org

Educational Background:
• Liberty University, Bachelor of Science-Education
• Liberty University, Master of Arts-Elementary Education

Why did you become a teacher?
In elementary school, I always struggled with reading, decoding and comprehension. I remember what it felt like to sit in class and not know the words or understand the words. I remember sitting in my Title 1 Reading teacher’s classroom when I first learned to discuss and apply what I learned from reading. I remember how elated I was in that very moment. From the moment I joined the world as a true reader, I knew I wanted to teach others.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
The most rewarding part of my job is that very moment when a student understands a concept I have taught them. It is truly amazing to watch my students apply the concepts they have learned to everyday life on their road to becoming a successful life-long learner. It is also very rewarding to see students improve throughout the year who have struggled.

What are your biggest challenges?
The biggest challenge I face as a teacher is getting all the tasks completed that need to be done. From lesson planning to grading papers to data collection, it is hard to fit everything in… in a timely fashion. However, I always remind myself that it will all get done, even when I feel otherwise!

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
My greatest personal accomplishment in my career is the relationships I have built with my students and their families. As teachers, we have a lot to do daily. I firmly believe in building relationships with my students and their families first, and everything else will fall into place.
I still keep in close contact with my former students and their families.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
I would have to say my favorite memories are my end of the year award ceremonies. Our year together is displayed in pictures along with music. The reactions I get from my students and their parents are truly heartwarming.

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
If I could pass along one thing to anyone thinking about or pursuing a career in education, it would be to simply love your students. Let your students know you care, hold them accountable, and show them how fun learning can be. Create a positive, safe learning environment and your students will amaze you.

Teaching is hard every moment of every day, but it is certainly very rewarding.

From His Nomination:
“Justin is so fun and caring and really goes the extra mile every day to make learning exciting. He has a passion and energy for his students that is
rare and I could not be happier that my daughter has the opportunity to be influenced by such an involved teacher that truly loves his class and teaching.”
—Kelly Dalton, parent


Emily Morris
School: Perrymont Elementary
Years as an Educator: 10
Currently Teaches:
Instructional coach, grades K-5

Special Recognition:
• 2011-2012 Perrymont ElementaryTeacher of the Year
• 2014-2015 Perrymont ElementaryTeacher of the Year

Educational Background:
• Liberty University, Bachelor of Arts-Elementary Education

Why did you become a teacher?
My elementary school teachers had a very positive impact on my life, and I wanted to do the same for young students.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
Seeing teachers and students excited about learning and about sharing what they have learned with others.

What are your biggest challenges?
Helping teachers meet the needs of all students in their classrooms, on such a wide range of learning levels, with limited time.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
Bringing teams of teachers together to share their learning and to work as a team in order to help all their students be successful.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
One of my favorite memories was having the students’ family members come in for breakfast in the classroom and our morning meeting.

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
Share your learning with others—no educator is an island. Working together you can achieve so much more for your students.

From Her Nomination:
My son thrived in her classroom. She brought science to life, and went above and beyond to schedule guest speakers on various subject material. Her joy over her students is obvious.”
—Parent


Debbie Lester
School: Brookville High School
Years as an Educator: 14
Currently Teaches: Economics and Personal Finance, VA/US Government

Special Recognition:
• 2014 Outstanding Economic Educator of the Year

Educational Background:
• Liberty University, Bachelor of Science-Social Science and History

Why did you become a teacher?
I love to inspire, encourage, and motivate—it was a natural fit for what I believe is my calling in life. Even as a young child, I loved playing school and having order. It’s funny because I enjoyed teaching in Sunday School and leading women’s fellowships but didn’t figure out that I should really be in the classroom until I was 30!

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
Building real relationships with my students and seeing them succeed not only in the classroom but in their lives. I believe that in order for me to have the most impact on my students lives, I have to be the “real” me. They know me for all my strengths, weaknesses, and craziness…but most of all they know I genuinely love teaching and I love them.

What are your biggest challenges?
I think there is a general belief by some that teaching is no longer honorable. There is a lot of negativity about public education that sometimes makes it discouraging. Being able to come into my classroom and focus on the reason I teach is what makes it all worth it.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
I love teaching Economics and Personal Finance. These are skills they will use their entire life. My favorite unit to teach is the stock market. We play the Stock Market Game each spring and have had great success with our teams every year. I have had the opportunity to take some of my students to Richmond and Washington, DC for recognition for building the most profitable portfolios in 10 weeks. Many of these students have never even left the Lynchburg area and for them to be able to be honored was a great experience for them.

Describe a favorite memorywith your students.
I think my favorite memory comes from this year and taking on the crazy student spirit club, renamed The Swarm. For several away football games, we took students on a spirit bus to cheer on our boys. The first game we had 52 students; the second game we had 102. Yes, it was crazy and loud, but we made really awesome memories for them!

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
Teaching is not for the faint of heart. It takes all of you—your heart, your soul, your mind—to teach and grow these students. Be prepared for great joy and great heartache. It is sort of like being a parent. Sometimes, you don’t see the payoff until after they are grown. Teachers invest all of themselves into their students because they see the great potential that lies within…it isn’t an easy job but like my dad has always told me: if everything was easy, it wouldn’t be worth it!

From Her Nomination:
“Our school has many kids that do not have a great home life, and Debbie fills a void many students have. She supports them, loves them, and treats them all like her very own.”
—Lindsey Sharman, co-worker


Ronda Chandler
School: Amherst County High School
Years as an Educator: 12
Currently Teaches: Health and Physical Education, 9th grade Girls

Special Recognition:
• Received Golden “A” from student for being an Inspirational Teacher

Educational Background:
• Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, Bachelor of Science-PreK-12 Health and Physical Education
• Emporia State University of Kansas, Master of Science-Health, PE and Recreation

Why did you become a teacher?
I grew up around children and liked the idea of inspiring young minds. I also was a year-round athlete throughout school and wanted the opportunity to be involved in school sports.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
When you have that one student who recognizes everything you do for your job is to help them be the best they possibly can. Knowing that the information that has been given to a student has been taken and applied to their future is not only a memorable but rewarding experience.

What are your biggest challenges?
A big challenge for me, as with any public educator, is funding. Physical Education equipment is expensive and the classes tend to be on the larger side. I have to be creative with the equipment I have while making class engaging and informative.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
My greatest personal accomplishment would be completing my master’s degree while teaching full time and coaching the varsity girls’ soccer team.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
Some of my fondest memories with my students are years after I have had them in class, and they come back to tell me how much they enjoyed my class. Also telling me that I have helped to show them that Physical Education could be fun and enjoyable is something I hold special.

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
To be an effective teacher you need to remember to not sweat the small stuff and to pick your battles with students. Remember, no one is perfect and everyone has their bad days, teachers and students alike. It takes just one smile or one compliment to brighten a student’s day and to leave a lasting impression.

From Her Nomination:
“She can always tell when something is wrong with one of her students. She often notices that I am anxious before I even tell anyone… She does her best to make health and PE fun… She makes gym interactive and comes up with ways to include all students… [Ms. Chandler] is not only an amazing teacher but a wonderful person who models compassion.”
—Grace Hall-Matson, student


Karen Rodriguez
School: New London Academy
Years as an Educator: 28
Currently Teaches: 5th Grade

Special Recognition:
• Bedford County Teacher of the Year (2004)

Educational Background:
• Concord College, Bachelor of Science
• University of Virginia, Master of Arts in Education-Curriculum and Instruction

Why did you become a teacher?
As long as I can remember, I have always valued education. Through life experience, I came to recognize that regardless of a person’s background, the opportunity to learn can be a game changer. I therefore chose to become an educator. This career would allow me to the give the gift of learning and impart knowledge, allowing my students to grow to their fullest potential.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
There are many rewards in the teaching field. However, for me, the most rewarding is the interactions I have with my students. Within my classroom, we build a community filled with learning, laughing and sharing. Our lessons extend beyond the curriculum. When my students exit the classroom, I feel confident they are better equipped for life’s challenges.

What are your biggest challenges?
In the high stakes world of testing, my biggest challenge is creating a meaningful and engaging curriculum. Today’s educational environment is highly focused on student assessment. I want my students to recognize that learning is much more than testing. Therefore, I strive to create lessons that are student-centric with choice and meaning.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
As I look back on my career, I feel my greatest accomplishment is the opportunity I have been given to mentor young educators. It is an honor to be able to work with the next generation of teachers and share my experiences. I am hopeful to provide continued leadership to my peers.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
One of my favorite memories is receiving a call from a high school teacher telling me about a letter a former student of mine had written.

The letter explained how the student’s perspective towards acceptance and respect of others was forever changed after her fifth grade year. I felt proud that beyond the academics, she had learned a lesson of love and compassion.

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
To look past the demands of the profession and recognize the purpose of your work. Some days, you will be frustrated and overwhelmed. When that happens, look toward your students: within them lies hope and the motivation to continue. Simply, they are worthy of your best.

From Her Nomination:
“[Mrs. Rodriguez] creates a safe and caring learning environment for all her students each day… She takes time to listen to my son…really listen to him. She engages all her students in learning. She is a difference maker.”
—Michelle Fluker, parent


Julie Speck
School: Heritage Elementary School
Years as an Educator: 13
Currently Teaches: Kindergarten

Special Recognition:
• 2012-2013 Heritage Elementary Teacher of the Year
• Received a 2017 grant for $1,310 for Augmented Reality Software (Learning Alive Plus) from Lynchburg Education Foundation
• Received $5,309 in grants through DonorsChoose.org over the past 5 years

Educational Background:
• Central Michigan University, Bachelor of Science-Elementary Education

Why did you become a teacher?
As a child (with a younger sibling), I spent countless hours playing school in my free time. As I continued my schooling, I saw just what an impact a teacher can have on a student. Teachers essentially are shaping the next generation! I think it’s an honor (and a calling) to be able to do that daily!

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
Every year I get a classroom full of students, some of which have never even held a pencil and can’t tell you their full name. After a year of hard work, these same students are leaving my classroom able to write short stories, read books independently, and do simple math problems. Seeing how much of a transformation each student makes at the end of the year has to be the most rewarding part of my job!

What are your biggest challenges?
Not having enough time in the day. Teaching is definitely not an 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. job! You teach until 3:30, make sure everyone gets home correctly, and return to your room to get ready for another day. In Kindergarten, that requires getting everything set for the next day, writing lesson plans, mentoring new teachers, attending meetings, searching for new grant options, researching new strategies, calling parents, and so much more.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
I believe my greatest accomplishment so far is staying current in the field of education. I am constantly researching new technology, instructional items, curriculums, etc. Being that many of the students I am currently teaching will probably have jobs that do not yet exist, I feel like it’s important to stay on top of new trends and ideas.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
On the 100th day of school, I LOVE to celebrate the number 100 with my students! I dress up as a 100-year-old granny named Miss Alice. The students are so sweet and empathetic, always willing to help me get around the school and complete a day packed full of activities involving the number 100! Some students join in the fun and dress up also.

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
FLEXIBILITY! Teachers make hundreds, if not thousands, of decisions during the day and are required to always be flexible. You may have an amazing lesson planned only to find out your smart board won’t turn on, the copier is broken, or there is no more paper, so you need to do something else. As professionals, the expectations people have for you are also ever changing. No two days will ever be the same or go entirely as you have planned, but it will definitely be rewarding!

From Her Nomination:
“Julie spends countless hours at home and at school finding ways to reach students. She is usually the last teacher to leave in the evenings and comes in to work on many weekends. She looks for new ways to help students stay engaged and enjoy school.” —Christine Harp, co-worker


Jessica Hott
School: Bedford Middle School
Years as an Educator: 15
Currently Teaches: 7th grade Civics & Economics

Special Recognition:
• 2015-2016 Bedford Middle School Teacher of the Year
• 2015-2016 Bedford Area Educational Foundation Grant Recipient-Digital Makerspace
• 2014-2015 Stonewall Jackson Middle School Teacher of the Year
• 2011 Richmond Flying Squirrels Baseball Teacher of the Year Nominee
• 2002-2003 Stonewall Jackson Middle School Beginning Teacher of the Year

Educational Background:
• Lynchburg College, Master of Education-Educational Leadership (present)
• Virginia Commonwealth University, Master of Education-Special Education
• Lynchburg College, Bachelor of Arts-Early Childhood Development

Why did you become a teacher?
Ever since I was old enough to remember, I had remarkable teachers who invested their time and energy into my future. Their nurturing support in my formative years was instrumental in my decision to become a teacher. Particularly Mrs. Palmer, who instilled the importance of character and self-determination.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
It’s all about the students! Walking into the classroom each and every day seeing a room full of smiling students ready and eager to learn. I love reaching the needs of all my students through creative, innovative and differentiated instruction. The joy of teaching is seeing sparks go off when students grasp content material and make connections with the past and present.

What are your biggest challenges?
Competing for my students’ attention and desire for technology while providing and promoting innovative learning experiences with that same technology is an ongoing challenge. In addition, differentiated instruction utilizing technology can be difficult with limited resources.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
In 2013, a student asked if I would sponsor her participation in the National History Bee, and I was able to recruit three more. The next year, I held a school-wide competition with over 80 students battling for one of four spots. After three years, the National History Bee became a county-wide competition with schools working together to prepare history buffs for the national competition. It is a rewarding feeling to see students soar and exceed their own expectations.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
My all-time favorite memory was of a 1920s unit. In collaboration with the school librarians, we turned the library into a 1920s speakeasy. Along with 1920s décor, stations were set up around the library. They included activities with 1920s slang words, a costume photo booth for students, KaHoot trivia and dancing the Charleston. Students were excited, engaged and quite impressed their teacher would dance the Charleston with them!

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
One daily contribution to education is something I think may be the smallest and easiest act: be kind. Students model behaviors from their teachers, and as much as we desire academic success, being kind never goes out of style. Teach kindness!

From Her Nomination:
“Ms. Hott is the type of teacher that will go above and beyond whether she was recognized as a Top Teacher or not. She truly cares for her students and puts in long hours to prepare lessons that promote critical thinking and application. She cares about the students that have less than others and she always advocates for their needs.” —Rhetta Watkins,
principal at Bedford Middle School


Robin Powell Wood
School: Robert S. Payne Elementary
Years as an Educator: 40
Currently Teaches: 3rd grade

Special Recognition:
• 1st “Teacher of the Year” for Robert S. Payne
• Recognized as “Teacher of the Year” by Wal-Mart

Educational Background:
• Longwood College, Bachelor of Science-Education

Why did you become a teacher?
My paternal grandmother was a teacher as I was growing up. I was fortunate enough to live behind her, so visits occurred frequently. My siblings, cousins and I would sit in rocking chairs on her big front porch and play “Kiddie College.” My grandmother would ask questions for us to answer. She made learning fun.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
Helping a child learn when they doubted themselves is amazing, but the most rewarding part is when I can make a difference in their lives. I want my students to feel safe, loved and admired. I want to help them see the value in making good choices and becoming the best person they can.

What are your biggest challenges?
There are many challenges day to day in every classroom. Can I solve all problems? No, but I have to try. I have to let my students know that they are all important to me and that I am one of their biggest fans. They speak, I listen.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
One year I had a student that was a “selective mute” who did not talk to many people at all. My daughter, who also works at my school, and I gave up our lunch and recess time to work with her. Once we got her laughing, words were not far behind, then sentences.

It wasn’t long before her mother was telling me what the child was doing at home.

She started going to sleepovers and even church. Her mother wrote to me several times over the years to let me know that her child was still progressing wonderfully.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
My favorite memories are when my former students come back to see me years later. Hearing their successes makes what I do worth it. Some of my former students are in the military (one flew rescue missions on a Black Hawk), a few are in education, some are in the medical field, and others have families they are proud of. Many times I go out in Lynchburg and hear, “Excuse me. Are you Mrs. Wood? You were my teacher. Remember when…” Luckily, I do still, “Remember when.”

Most of the time I even remember their names. They ask, “Are you still teaching?”
I can proudly say, “Yes, I am.”

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
Teaching is not easy. In the beginning, you will go home crying about your experiences. How could I have been a better teacher today? How can I make a difference? Your heart breaks over the hardships that some of your students are dealing with. You have to dry your tears and find joy and purpose in what you are doing. Find ways to help your students cope with any hardships. Create a classroom of trust and mutual caring. First, you have to build community in that classroom. Then the learning will come.

From Her Nomination:
“Her motherly love and high expectations create a motivating environment for all students. It is evident that she cares personally for each child and takes a genuine interest in each one’s life. She takes the time to find out what is important to them and she remembers the details-the things that
matter to her students.”
—Becky Scott, co-worker


Betsy Layne
School: James River Day School
Years in Education: 20
Currently Teaches: 1st grade

Special Recognitions:
• Nominated for the Disney Teacher Award
• William M. Walker Family Meritorious Teaching Award

Educational Background:
• Elon College, Bachelor of Arts-Education
• University of Virginia, Master of Arts-Reading

Why did you become a teacher?
My mother and kindergarten teacher were instrumental in my decision to become a teacher. They instilled the love of creative play in me. I still remember climbing through refrigerator boxes and creating a drive up window to my house for shopping. Every summer I was a camp counselor for the recreation department in my hometown of East Aurora, NY. It was in that close knit community where I learned to connect with children early on.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?
The joy I get when a child has that, “I think I can, I know I can” moment and their eyes begin to sparkle because they finally made a connection is unbelievable. That is the gift of teaching and making connections is key. When I look back on my career, I have built friendships of a lifetime. I have been blessed to work with individuals who are positive and upbeat, which is contagious.

What are your biggest challenges?
My biggest challenge is time. I often wish I had more time in the day to engage in learning experiences with my students. I feel success when my students say, “The day is already over? You know what that means, time flies when we are having fun!” I often think that when you love what you are doing, the time really does pass too quickly.

Looking back at your career, what would you say is your greatest personal accomplishment?
Getting my master’s degree before I became a mother. This gave me the opportunity to pursue my passion of becoming a reading specialist. My most recent accomplishment is that I have begun to embrace technology after years of trying to hold on to my “flip phone.” This year, my first graders became global engineering partners with a class in Bangalore, India. This has been a really cool experience.

Describe a favorite memory with your students.
Looking back, I think of the time when we took our kindergarten students to Virginia Beach. When we finally arrived at the beach, it was unreal to see my students’ expressions when I announced, “Roll up your pants and run through the ocean!” Many of my students had never left their small town before, and here they were, in the ocean, frolicking with their friends. That was an awesome day that I will never forget!

If you could pass along one thing to others about the education field, what would it be?
To have a sense of humor and to connect with your students and their families. I feel blessed to have worked with so many amazing families over the last 20 years. One thing that I strive hard to do is build character in my students.

My goal is to help my students become the best “tiny” citizens they can be.

From Her Nomination:
“My daughter was very nervous joining a new school and a new class at the end of the school year. After she spent a morning in the class before our move, Mrs. Layne had each student sign a welcome card for my daughter and then sent it to our home….The students in her class are engaged, happy, and come home every single day excited to go back the next.” —Michelle Davis, parent


Top Teachers 11-25

Tosha Weddle
Stewartsville Elementary School

Diane Brown
Dunbar Middle School

Amanda Barclay
Forest Elementary School

Michael Long
E.C. Glass High School

Sarah Davis
Brookville High School

Jennifer Anderson
Virginia Episcopal School

Dana Beall
Linkhorne Middle School

Nathan Kurko
Amherst Middle School

Kerry Doremus
Paul Munro Elementary School

Barry Calloway
Bedford Science and Technology Center

Victoria Meredith
Rustburg High School

Traci Miller
Amherst County High/Middle School

Jonathan Collins
Amherst County High SChool

Ashley Nowell
Bedford Hills Elementary School

Michael Myers
Campbell County Technical Center

Share.

Comments are closed.

Our Other Publications

lynchburg business magazine central virginia bridal guide central virginia family guide lynchburg restaurant week website